A Brighter Future for Manufacturing, 3-D Printed One Layer at a Time: Scientific American

Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s robotic prosthesis looks like something out of medieval times—a hand clad in chain mail more appropriate for wielding a broadsword than a mug of coffee. Both the underlying skeleton and thin, meshlike skin are made of…

Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s robotic prosthesis looks like something out of medieval times—a hand clad in chain mail more appropriate for wielding a broadsword than a mug of coffee. Both the underlying skeleton and thin, meshlike skin are made of titanium to make the hand durable and dexterous while also keeping it lightweight. The powerful miniature hydraulics that move the fingers rely on a network of ducts integrated into the prosthesis’s structure—no drilled holes, hoses or couplings required.

Yet what makes this robot hand special is not what it can make or do but rather how it was made and what it represents. Conceived on a computer and assembled from a few dozen printed parts by so-called additive manufacturing, more popularly known as 3-D printing, Oak Ridge’s invention offers a glimpse into the future of manufacturing—a future where previously impossible designs can be printed to order in a matter of hours.
This article was originally published with the title To Print the Impossible.

Subscribe
Buy This Issue

Already a Digital subscriber? Sign-in Now
If your institution has site license access, enter here.